Must Have: Fireplaces & Accessories

By Molly Absolon

Valley designers and architects (and us!) share some of our favorite fireplaces and accessories below. We’ve even found a way to bring fire to spaces that, for whatever reason, can’t have a traditional fireplace or wood-burning stove.

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Add Fire

Brad Hoyt of CTA Architects Engineers in Jackson says he is always on the lookout for the right project for the Fireorb. A futuristic, oval-shaped woodstove, the Fireorb is suspended in midair to create the impression of a fire floating in space. “It’s what George Jetson would do!” Hoyt says. “It sets a tone that is definitively not rustic.” The Fireorb is available as wood- or gas-burning. From $5,900, fireorb.net

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Shannon White Burns of Shannon White Design is crazy about the ceramic, stackable modular stoves designed by Adriano Design and manufactured from natural clay by Italian company La Castellamonte Stufe. The clay modules, finished with glazes in a variety of colors, hold heat for hours after the fire goes out. From $8,995 plus $2,300 for shipping; available in the U.S. through distributor Todd Smith of API Design in Saranac Lake, New York; apidesign.us, stackstoves.com/en

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Inside Design Studio designer Jessica Travis Ginter likes to give clients looking for a wood-burning stove an economical choice—but not at the expense of good looks. “I love the beautiful minimalist design of stoves from companies like Wittus,” she says, “but they are pricey and hard to find.” Ginter says the Hearthstone Bari 8170, available in black and gray soapstone, has similar lines but is more affordable and can be purchased locally. From $4,999, Leisure Time Inc. Idaho Falls, leisuretimeidahofalls.com

Freestanding FlamesFire_04Fire_05

When a traditional fireplace with a flue or chimney isn’t an option, look at the freestanding fireplaces by EcoSmart Fire. They can be placed in a room like any piece of furniture and cast cozy flames by burning bioethanol, a renewable and clean fuel. No venting required. The Fusion model is glass-framed in black, red, or white. Smaller spaces have the Ghost, made of glass and steel. Ghost from $2,652, Fusion from $6,470, ecosmartfire.com

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Striking Out

Strike a match directly on Farmhouse Pottery’s special stoneware and it ignites. Gather compliments on the cuteness of its Milk Bottle Match Striker, which looks like its name implies and holds matches instead of milk. From $38, farmhousepottery.com

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The Pits

“The Cowboy Cauldron is not your average fire pit,” says Hayden Jones, an interior designer and the owner of Festive Living. “It’s an amazing addition to your outdoor entertaining space. You can enjoy a campfire in your own backyard, and you can even grill on it. It’s a conversation piece of supreme quality that you will enjoy for a lifetime.” From $1,500, Festive Living, 13 S. Main St. Victor, Idaho; 208/787-3378, festive-living.com, cowboycauldron.com

The Perfect Stoke

Fire_08Interior designer Agnes Bourne likes Tuell and Reynolds’ Montana Fire Tool Set, handmade in Northern California from architectural bronze and stainless steel, and available in a variety of finishes. “The collection is artist-made and -designed, and good for a western lifestyle, either modern or traditional,” Bourne says. Price available upon request, tuellreynolds.com

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Architect Hoyt loves the simplicity and utility of Danish company RAIS’ fireplace tools. RAIS makes a number of different models, but Hoyt favors the Buteo line, made of black steel with contrasting stainless steel handles, for its graceful curved form. From $270, us.rais.com

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Behind the Screen

Designer Bourne again picks Tuell and Reynolds when asked for a favorite fire screen. Their Venice model features a light, airy web made from bronze. Slices of Brazilian agate embedded in the weave change color and hue with the intensity of the flames. “The Venice screen makes the fireplace a work of art,” Bourne says. “It has a practical use and also creates beauty.” Price available upon request, tuellreynolds.com

Hold It

Fire_11The design of Crate & Barrel’s steel-frame log holder melds modern form with traditional function. Its clean lines and minimalist structure store a 48-inch tower of logs. From $199, crateandbarrel.com

Keep wood organized with this galvanized steel log holder from Creative Co-op. This is a favorite accessory of Christina Lincoln, Home Again’s manager, because it combines the look of an old washing bucket with simple, modern lines. It adds “a classic, rustic touch to your hearth,” Lincoln says. From $95, Home Again, 890 US Highway 89, 307/739-223

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